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The Power of Three

Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup!” Mama swore when she was frustrated, disgusted, or nearly angry.  She also said it when she was spooked. “Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup!” 

And, should Mama break a glass, she spat out, “Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup!” followed by Tph. Tph. Tph. Three pretend spits to the floor. Bad luck, go away!

It was years, decades before I figured out what Mama meant by “Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup!” 

All those times, Mama was pleading to the Big, Mighty Three. The Holy Family.  Jesus, Mary, and Joseph.

-30-


Prompt for Friday Writings: The Power of Three. 

Comments

  1. Nothing like calling in the big guns! :)

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  2. Love this tale of 'three' ... a peek inside your life / past.

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  3. Oh. Yeah, it would have taken me a long time to figure that out, too.

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  4. This was such an enjoyable read. Fun and nostalgia dancing together, letting us glimpse into the story of you (and you mom). I wonder if you say “Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup!” as an adult?

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    1. This morning, the Husband spilled his cereal on him. He felt much better when I said Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup.

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  5. I love this and mama's remedy. Honest to goodness I say that too with an addition: Jesus, Mary, Mother & Joseph. Don't know why. But I'm always breaking glasses. Enjoyed your trinity and thanks for visiting me.

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  6. She was a beautiful lady! I need to memorize this....sounds better than what I say! lol

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  7. I love to say 'Jesus, Mary and Joseph' in an Irish accent!

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    1. I think I heard Jesus, Mary, and Joseph being said in an Irish movie that got me to realizing what Mama was saying.

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  8. What a lovely reminiscence you share with us. And I adore the photo, is that your mum? Such elegance! They need to bring balloon sleeves back! :-)

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    1. Yes, that was Mama when she was 56 years old. Filipinos call the sleeves Maria Clara sleeves. Mama wore them well. I look ridiculous in them, lol.

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  9. That fake spitting to ward off evil happens here as well .. wonder where it all came from!!!

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    1. I found an article in which the author said it began with the Greeks.

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  10. Yes, agree with Rosemary, nothing like calling in the big guns.
    The fake spitting thing, our culture (at least the older folks) practise it too. :)

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    1. I had no idea the three fake spits thing was so universal. I wonder which culture brought it to the Philippines, or whether it was an indigenous thing.

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  11. Ha....My grandmother used to say that....but it sounds different in French:)

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    1. I had to go listen to Jesus, Mary, and Joseph in French. I imagined it being said fiercely, still sounded nice in my head. lol

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  12. What a wonderful mixed-up phrase memory! I love it. Our family has a few of those, and once you figure them out, you never want to change them to the real thing. "Hay-zeus-mar-ee-yo-sup" is perfect just the way it is!

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  13. Reminds me of my childhood and the things my mom said and did... though I did learn to swear in Spanish that way too (she thought I was out of earshot when she did it).

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    Replies
    1. Same here. In Ilocano though. Mama was pretty creative with her swear words.

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Thanks for the good cheer. :-)

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