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Jane Eyre


This week Sunday Stealing, hosted by Bev Sykes, is all about choosing a book and discussing it via a bunch of questions. My choice is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.

1.  Why did you pick the book?
Jane Eyre is the #1 book on my list of all-time favorites, which I put on the top of the list after I read it 10 years ago, more or less. It kicked Pride & Prejudice to #2 after 40 or so years. Until I saw the movie adaption with Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens, I resisted reading Jane Eyre in full. I had no idea Jane had such gumption. In middle school, I read segments in our English textbook so I knew the main plot, but all the good stuff that would've got me to the read the book wasn' there. And, when I saw the movie adaption with Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine back then, I was definitely not interested in reading the book because the film portrayed Jane and Mr. Rochester as simpy, unlikeable characters.
 
2.  What did you think about the book?
Jane is an independent, strong-willed, intelligent, practical, resourceful, and creative character. She pursued life and living no matter what heartaches and harsh obstacles were thrown her way. Because I liked Jane, I got involved in her story.

3.  What do you know about the author?
Charlotte Bronte lived in the 19th century when women writers were frowned upon so she and her sisters published their novels under pseudonyms that belied their sex.

4.  What’s the most memorable scene?
Homeless and penniless, and  cold and hungry, Jane roamed the expansive, desolate moors after leaving Thornfield Hall.  

5.  How did the book make you feel?
Jane reinforced my belief that I can do anything and live through any crisis, as long as I put my mind to it.

6.  How do you feel about the way the story was told?
Bronte wrote the story in first person, with Jane being the narrator. Bronte developed the story so well that I forgot it was being told in first-person. 


7.  Which parts of the book stood out to you?
a) Young Jane living with her arrogant, unloving aunt and cousins. b) The conversations between Jane and Rochester.  c) Jane leaving Rochester despite her love for him. d) Jane roaming the moors. e) Jane, under a fake name, living and working as a schoolteacher in Morton. f) Jane and Rochester reuniting.

8.  Which specific parts of the protagonist can you relate to?
Jane's positivity and sense of right and wrong. Also, that Jane did not give up, and that she was able to adapt to and modify circumstances to keep afloat.

9.  Which character did you relate to the most?     Jane Eyre.


10. Share a line or passage from the book.
“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.”

11. What did you think about the ending?
It worked for me. Jane ended up with her true love, but not before she became financially independent.

12. Is the story plot driven or character driven?     Both.

13. If the book was made into a movie, what changes or decisions would you hope for?
There have been many movie, TV, radio, and theater adaptions of Jane Eyre. I've seen 4 or 5 versions. I like the movies which stayed as true as possible to the novel.


14. How did the book change you?
I read this book in my 50s which would've been different if I was in my youth. Had I read it when I was much younger, Jane would've been another inspiration of a strong, independent, intelligent, and thoughtful woman making it on her own. In my 50s, the book reaffirmed that I did all right for myself.

15. If the book is part of a series, how does it stand on its own?
 It's not part of a series. By the way, Jane Eyre was published in 1847.

To check out what other bloggers have chosen for Sunday Stealing, click here.


Comments

  1. I've never read this. I don't know why. I'll have to add it to my list to read soon!

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  2. Well, I have not read this either and you make some good points. I am almost 50, so maybe it is time! Maybe I would appreciate this book now. Loved your answers! Have a nice Sunday!

    https://lorisbusylife.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thanks, Lori. If it weren't for seeing that movie version, I doubt I would've given Jane Eyre a read. I was surprised how much I liked her.

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  3. It was the 1980s adaptation that caused me to read the book. I don't know if I've seen the adaptation you've mentioned. I"ll have to look that up. Because there have been some awful versions. A couple I had to throw up my hands and walk away from, because they were so bad.

    Have you seen Wide Sargasso Sea? It's based on the book of the same name. It takes the story from the first Mrs. Rochester's perspective. And Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier has the same story (with a few plot alterations), and you won't convince me otherwise.

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    1. Was that the one with Timothy Dalton? I liked that version, too. My goal is to watch all the film adaptions. I read somewhere that Charleston Heston starred in one and did quite well. I can't imagine it, but then I don't think much of the actor. I'll have to see that version when I'm open-minded.
      I've heard about Wide Sargasso Sea, but never curious to see or read it because I don't like the first Mrs. Rochester. Here I am again showing my biases, lol. I've got Rebecca on my definitely must-read list now.

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  4. great artwork to illustrate your answers Susie! Very thoughtful!

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    1. Thanks, LeeAnna! All old illustrations. It's time to do more.

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  5. I have yet to read this book but I learned more here than before. I have seen an early 1933 version but not many others. Which was your favourite film version?

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    1. I've seen four versions so far. Currently my favorite is the one with Ruth Wilson. The latest with Mia W. was okay; it followed the major points. Until recently, I had no idea there have been a lot of TV, movie, radio, and theater adaptions of Jane Eyre. I'm in search of two versions: one with Ciaran Hinds, the other with George C. Scott.

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  6. I remember reading it or seeing the movie but I can't remember it now! Love that quote.

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    1. If I were ever to embroider, I'd stitch that quote.

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  7. Hello,

    I do not remember reading this book, maybe I did back as a young student. I have to add it to my reading list.. I enjoyed your answers and your art work and photos. Take care! Enjoy your day! Wishing you a happy new week!

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  8. I read this many years ago (probably in high school in the 50s). I loved it and thoroughly enjoyed your report. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks, Bev. I was very surprised how much I like the book and the character.

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  9. I remember trying to read novels of that era when I was far too young to grasp the complexities of what I was reading. I wonder how I will fare here in my 60's? :)

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    1. Probably better, Widders. David Copperfield was another book that I didn't read until I saw a movie adaption in the 1980s.

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  10. Su-sieeemac - it has been several decades since I read this book in high school, and I believe it didn't have much impact on me then because the "issue" of women needing to be strong and independent was not at the forefront as it is today. So your comment about how you might have felt differently about the book in your youth resonated with me! Enjoy the rest of your week, my friend!

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    1. It's only now that I realize the books I enjoyed the most from childhood and youth, such as Jo March, Anne Shirley, Elizabeth Bennett, Nancy Drew, the Girl of the Limberlost, and Penny Parrish were strong, independent females. Thank goodness. But then does any fiction author write a main character who is far less. Hmm, that's got me wondering.

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  11. I want to read it again now *and* I want to see the newer movie version you mentioned (the one with Ruth Wilson). I am too lazy to blog challenges like this one, but you sure have me thinking about what my answers would have been. I’ve been slowly adding old favorites to my Kindle library and it’s really nice to have them always on hand. (No room for lots of bookshelves is a downside to small space living..)

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    1. Oooh, Sallie, you've got me wondering what you're favorite titles are. After 16 years, the Husband and I finally took our books out of boxes. It feels so good to be surrounded by books, well except for their dust. achooo.

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  12. Jane is also one of my favorite books and I've seen just about all films of it

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  13. Thank you for your kind words on my blog post. Blogger is not directing comments to my email ARRRGGHH!
    So you are on your way to becoming a cyborg also..congrats. Cataract surgery is pretty smooth and the result are immediate and gratifying. Knees are another matter..I speak as an expert as you know. Lots of nice pain pills and boring rehab but after you are done with pills and rehab, you will dance again!

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    1. I look forward to dancing under my full power again. Sometimes I get up and wiggle waggle my bottom, especially if I have a cane with me. I've become a great wiggle-waggle dancer in my chair, so I think. :-)

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  14. Oh yeah..and also I am following you as I love a sense of humor such as yours-can't get enough of it.

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  15. Yes also Jane Eyre...love it, read it at least 3 times over my life. Seen all the movies. But what gets me is how in literature at that time (see also Ibsen's Dollhouse), women had to have money to gain independence. Jane could not go to her love until she was equal financially. Further, her money was inherited from her uncle in the West Indies whose wealth was based on sugar and slaves. Not something that resonated in those days but does todayt.

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    1. You got me thinking, Pam. Jane Austen's characters weren't concerned with being financially independent before marrying, but Austen was a generation ahead of Charlotte Bronte. Sign of the times. Now I wonder how the industrial revolution plays a factor in Bronte's character development. Hmmm, Jane Eyre's childhood reminds me of Charles Dickens' characters. I'm rambling now. Pam, boy do you have me wondering. Off to Google, I go.

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