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J is for 13 Different Joints


The Husband and I held a joint discussion (1) over the stool that was painted today: What's the best way to detach the cracked masterpiece of a seat?

The painting of the stool, though, was not a joint effort (2); however, the Husband and I are joint authors (3) of four titles about various careers.

Did my voice sound disjointed (4) in the previous paragraphs? Didactic, possibly also pedantic? That how I sounded when I wrote educational materials once-upon-a-time, except I wrote concepts in simple sentences, straightforward without any editorial commentary or unneeded adjectives, at a third grade reading level. I have digressed. Hope that astray didn't get anyone's toes out of joint (5).

Jeeez, Jeeves, this joint (6) is jumping!


Fats Waller had me dancing. My knee joints (7) are fine, as long as I don't do something silly like the splits or the Charleston.

Until two years, when I consulted a joint specialist (8) I had no idea my legs are jointed (9) awkwardly. The doctor told me he could fix my knees but he couldn't straighten my leg. It's crooked?

When I was 10 or 11 years old, Mama told me that Uncle Frank thought something was wrong with my legs. I shrugged as did Mama. Thus, that was the end of the subject until 52 years later.


Do these daisy bushes look like they may be holding a joint peace talk (10)? Obviously, they're not passing a joint (11).  No being handcuffed and taken to the joint (12), should they be. 

There you go. Time to leave this joint (13) and get something done.

I'm hooking up with blogging friends at ABC Wednesday and Thirteen Thursday. Come along, why don't you?  Thank you, kind hosts!


Comments

  1. The daisies look like they're jumping and why not because the roof is rockin'. If you look at the flowers while playing Fats Waller they'll start moving. Or is that just me and a touch of vertigo? Writing education materials must have been soooooo boring but I bet it paid well. A journalism professor once told me I would never cut it as proof reader, witch meybe he'z got a pointe. I'm thinking writing education materials is similar. I remember being told writing for a daily paper was writing for the lowest common denominator, third grade sounds about right.

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    Replies
    1. I loved writing the education stuff. Back then, one of my objectives was to get into curriculum development, which meant first being a school teacher. Fortunately for me, I got hired as a book editor for a small special education publisher, so I didn't have to go the public school route. We wrote supplementary science, history, English workbooks for special needs teenage and adult learners. It didn't pay well, but it was enough for me.

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    2. I think it's better to love your job than to get paid beau coup bucks, Susie.

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    3. Back then, I thought if I ever got paid $30,000 or more, I'd quit after 3 years because I would've saved a lot. As it was, I became a freelance writer/editor after 4 years at the publishing house.

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  2. This is very clever! You have a way with words. I also read your comment above. I would love to be a book editor for a publisher. I've been in public school education for 30 years, and I'm ready to get out. I have been thinking about retiring, and I would get a decent income afterwards, but I would rather have a different job to supplement it. Any suggestions on putting myself out there for publishers?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Forgetfulone. It has been over 20 years since I've worked on an education project, so I have no idea what publishers are out there. I don't think much has changed in terms of educational publishers hiring teachers or ex-teachers to write test items, chapters, sections, or books, usually on a freelance basis. I've written projects for a flat fee, as well as for royalties.
      To see what's around, you might do a Google search of educational publishers. If you're looking for freelance work, you may be able to find such information at their websites.
      To build up your publishing experience and clips, you might contribute articles and lessons to print and web magazines for teachers and educators.
      Hope that helps. Good luck.

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  3. What a mind trip. What kind of joint might you be smokin? Really I forgot there were so many ways to use joint until you reminded me.

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  4. I love words. All kinds of words, maybe some alliteration. You are a clever lady. I bow to your cleverness!

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  5. Well, if you haven't had any issues with your legs, I'd say they are fine. But what do I know? I'm not a doctor... )

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    1. Doctor, doctor, it hurts when I do this. (Patient raises arm over her head.)
      Says the doctor, Then don't do it.
      hahahahah. That corny joke cracks me up all the time.

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  6. Heh, heh, heh . . . what joy-nt I took in reading your adventures! :)

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  7. Interesting narrative around letter J.

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  8. awesome! that was a lot of fun, Suzie, nice job!

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  9. Well as long as the fun wast a 'joint venture' too I am all good ;-)

    Have a splendid, ♥-warming ABC-Wednes-day / -week at https://abcwednesday.com
    ♫ M e l d y ♪ (ABC-W-team)
    http://melodyk.nl/24-j

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  10. Love the word Joint in all you wrote above and those daisies are so beautiful. It is still drab here and probably getting snow again

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    Replies
    1. The weather guys say we'll be having rain off and on over the next two weeks. I hope they're right.

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Thanks for the good cheer. :-)

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